Parenthood: Helping Your Daughter Cope with Childless Marriage

Childless Marriage

Childless MarriageYour daughter’s childless marriage puts a strain in her life that most people cannot understand. The sensitive nature of her circumstances requires your active support in her efforts to resolve infertility, deal with the prospect of childlessness, and overcome her grief.

When She Pursues Treatment

Not all couples in this situation immediately resort to infertility treatments. Women usually find it difficult to face the daunting possibility of remaining childless should treatments fail to work on them. Your daughter might not open herself to friends and even immediate family members in fear of being judged.

The misconception that she needs to be checked upon or advised directly about the treatment often hinders an effective support system. She needs people to keep her grounded and constantly remind her of her other goals in life. Take her out to dinner and encourage her to travel abroad or to pursue something she always wanted to do. Activities that help her attain a fresh perspective in life serve as the best means to relieve stress. Otherwise, she might risk overworking herself or resorting to similar things that would distract her, but would also risk her health.

When He Suffers from Isolation

People tend to think that women want children more than men do. This misconception on childlessness, therefore, makes people believe that only women to feel frustrated.

You as a parent should initiate reaching out to your son-in-law and treating his grief with the same earnestness you give your daughter. Men, after all, suffer as much as women do in the face of a childless marriage. Your intervention aids in sustaining their relationship as husband and wife and also as individuals. This proves especially crucial when the impact of this predicament temporarily disables them from looking after one another.

When Grieving is Unavoidable

The inability to conceive children, especially when she expects to mother one, equates to loss and demands its own form of grieving. Give her time to recover, and constantly serve as a reminder of the other good things present in her life.

Reaching out to her first relieves her of the idea that she deprives you of enjoying grandchildren. While painful, this is merely another challenge of parenthood you must bear.